• Address 720 East Locust Street | Milwaukee, WI 53212
  • Phone 414.263.5001
  • Hours Tue-Fri 11-8pm | Sat-Sun 12-5pm | Closed Mon
  • Hours Tue-Fri 11-8pm, Sat-Sun 12-5pm, Closed Mon
Event Calendar
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readings & workshops
August 1

Poetry Reading: Ching-In Chen, Dawn Tefft & Brenda Cárdenas 

readings & workshops
August 8

Poetry Reading: Poetry in the Park

special events
August 12

Joan LoPresti & Bob Danner

readings & workshops
August 13

Poetry Reading: Matthew Johnstone, Annie Grizzle & Nathan Fredrick

Archived readings & workshops
Sep 15 Tuesday, September 15
7:00pm, FREE

Join supporters of Planned Parenthood for a facilitated discussion at Woodland Pattern Book Center.

A Chicago Tribune 'Best Books of 2014'


A Washington Post '50 Notable Works of Nonfiction & Best Science Books 2014'


A Chicago Tribune 'Nonfiction Books to Gift 2014'


A Slate 'Best Books 2014: Staff Picks'


A Booklist '2014 Editor’s Choice' & 'Top 10 Science and Health Books of 2014'


A St. Louis Post-Dispatch 'Best Books of 2014: Nonfiction'

Jonathan Eig's The Birth of the Pill tells the fascinating story of one of the most important scientific discoveries of the twentieth century.

We know it simply as "the pill," yet its genesis was anything but simple. Jonathan Eig's masterful narrative revolves around four principal characters: the fiery feminist Margaret Sanger, who was a champion of birth control in her campaign for the rights of women but neglected her own children in pursuit of free love; the beautiful Katharine McCormick, who owed her fortune to her wealthy husband, the son of the founder of International Harvester and a schizophrenic; the visionary scientist Gregory Pincus, who was dismissed by Harvard in the 1930s as a result of his experimentation with in vitro fertilization but who, after he was approached by Sanger and McCormick, grew obsessed with the idea of inventing a drug that could stop ovulation; and the telegenic John Rock, a Catholic doctor from Boston who battled his own church to become an enormously effective advocate in the effort to win public approval for the drug that would be marketed by Searle as Enovid.

Spanning the years from Sanger’s heady Greenwich Village days in the early twentieth century to trial tests in Puerto Rico in the 1950s to the cusp of the sexual revolution in the 1960s, this is a grand story of radical feminist politics, scientific ingenuity, establishment opposition, and, ultimately, a sea change in social attitudes. Brilliantly researched and briskly written, The Birth of the Pill is gripping social, cultural, and scientific history.
 

Books will be available at the event.

No need to read in advance.