• Address 720 East Locust Street | Milwaukee, WI 53212
  • Phone 414.263.5001
  • Hours Tue-Fri 11-8pm | Sat-Sun 12-5pm | Closed Mon
  • Hours Tue-Fri 11-8pm, Sat-Sun 12-5pm, Closed Mon
Event Calendar
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readings & workshops
April 6 - Sep 28

Book Club: Readshops led by Karl Gartung

readings & workshops
July 3 - Sep 25

Dhamma MKE

exhibitions
August 1 - Sep 26

The Point Being: Works by Thomas Gaudynski

readings & workshops
September 5

Br!NK New Play Festival

film & video
September 6

aCinema presents Aurora Picture Show’s Extremely Shorts Touring Program

readings & workshops
September 7

Poetry Reading: Ana Božičević & Annie Grizzle

readings & workshops
September 7

Poems are a River: Writing Built and Natural Form - a workshop with Ana Božičević

performances
September 11

Thomas Gaudynski, Linda Binder, and Mark Mantel performing in response to The Point Being

exhibitions
September 14

AVIARY: Selected Paintings by Ken Wood - Book Release and Reception

performances
September 15

Alternating Currents Live presents Silvia Bolognesi and Russ Johnson

performances
September 19

Formations Series for New and Improvised Music

readings & workshops
September 20

Poetry Reading: John Sierpinski, Sylvia Cavanaugh, and Ed Werstein

Archived readings & workshops
May 16 Tuesday, May 16
7:00pm, $Give What You Can

Join us to celebrate Mai Der Vang’s Afterland (Graywolf Press, 2017), winner of the Walt Whitman Award of the Academy of American Poets


Mai Der Vang’s Afterland is a powerful collection of poetry that recounts with devastating detail the Hmong exodus from Laos and the fate of thousands of refugees seeking asylum. By telling the story of her own family, Vang also provides an essential history of the Hmong culture’s ongoing resilience in exile. Many of these poems are written in the voices of those fleeing unbearable violence after US forces recruited Hmong fighters in Laos in the Secret War against communism, only to abandon them. That history is little known, but the three hundred thousand Hmong now living in the United States are living proof of its aftermath. With poems of extraordinary force and grace, Afterland holds an original place in American poetry and lands with a sense of humanity saved, of outrage, of a deep tradition broken by war and ocean but still intact, remembered, and lived. 

 

Mai Der Vang is an editorial member of the Hmong American Writers’ Circle and coeditor of How Do I Begin: A Hmong American Literary Anthology. Her essays have appeared in the New York Times, San Francisco Chronicle, and the Washington Post.