• Address 720 East Locust Street | Milwaukee, WI 53212
  • Phone 414.263.5001
  • Hours Tue-Fri 11-8pm | Sat-Sun 12-5pm | Closed Mon
  • Hours Tue-Fri 11-8pm, Sat-Sun 12-5pm, Closed Mon
Event Calendar
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readings & workshops
April 6 - Jun 27

Book Club: Readshops led by Karl Gartung

readings & workshops
July 3 - Jun 30

Dhamma MKE

readings & workshops
October 22 - Jun 24

Welcome Home!: A Veterans Writing Group

readings & workshops
February 2 -23

Three Windows into Writing and Revising a Poem with Kathleen A. Dale

exhibitions
February 11 - Apr 5

Tarot: The (Re)Making of a Language

performances
February 20

Formations Series for New and Improvised Music

readings & workshops
February 26

Poetry Reading: Jennifer Elise Foerster + Zoë Johnson

readings & workshops
February 26

Seeing in Invisibility: Poetry as revelation at UWM Libraries Special Collections

readings & workshops
February 27

Urban Echo Poets

readings & workshops
February 29

Visionary Narratives: A Workshop in Drawing Inspiration with Laurence Ross.

exhibitions
February 29

Reception for Tarot: The (Re)Making of a Language

readings & workshops
March 1 -29

On the Front Lines, Behind the Lines: Writing Protest Poetry with Margaret Rozga.

film & video
March 6

aCinema Screening

readings & workshops
March 12

Creative Confluence: Research for Hybrid Writing, a conversation with Heid E. Erdrich

readings & workshops
March 12

Poetry Reading: Heid E. Erdrich

readings & workshops
March 14

Poetry & Pi(e) featuring Vida Cross + Chuck Stebelton

performances
March 19

Formations Series for New and Improvised Music

readings & workshops
March 20

Poetry Reading: Mark Bibbins + Elizabeth Hoover

readings & workshops
March 26

Poetry Reading: Eli Goldblatt + Charles Alexander

readings & workshops
March 28

Poetry Reading: Tara Betts + Jennifer Steele

Archived readings & workshops
May 18 Saturday, May 18
7:00pm, $Give What You Can

Poet and critic Lila Zemborain is the author of several poetry collections, including Abrete sésamo debajo del agua (1993), Usted (1998), Guardianes del secreto (2002) - translated into English as Guardians of the Secret (2009), Malvas orquídeas del mar (2004) - translated into English as Mauve Sea-orchids (2007), and Diario de la hamaca paraguaya (2014), as well as the chapbooks Ardores (1989), and Pampa (2001). She has collaborated with artist Martin Reyna on La couleur de l’ eau / El color del agua (2008), translated into French by Sarah T. Reyna, and with poet Joan Navarro and artist Pere Salinas on Llum Cinabri / Calma tectónica (2015), translated into Catalan by Joan Navarro. Her work has also appeared in the art catalogues Alessandro Twombly (2007), translated by Rosa Alcalá, Heidi McFall (2005), translated by Hanya Wozniak, and in numerous publications from Latin America, Spain and the US. Zemborain holds a Ph.D. degree from New York University. As a critic, she is the author of Gabriela Mistral. Una mujer sin rostro (2002). She is the Creative editor of Xul Solar. Jorge Luis Borges. The Art of Friendship (2013). She has been the director and editor of the Rebel Road Series (2000-2007) and, since 2004, she curates the KJCC Poetry Series at New York University. She has taught in the Summer Writing Program at Naropa University, and was awarded a John Simon Guggenheim fellowship, a Residency Fellowship at the Millay Colony, and she was a finalist for the Festival de la Lira Award, from Ecuador. She was the Director of NYU’s Creative Writing in Spanish Program from 2009 to 2012.


Elias Sepulveda was born to Mexican immigrants in Los Angeles where he lived until he moved to Wisconsin more than twenty years ago. He has this to say about writing: "Poetry is a very confessional medium for me. Growing up in rougher neighborhoods with extremely conservative parents and family created this vacuum, this suffocation, that essentially stagnated my voice. There was no place for the expression of emotions or reflection on the hardships of everyday life because those types of activities were considered a weakness, and that made someone a target. I intuitively developed a strategy in my writing, using abstract form like surrealism, while adding depth to my work through multiple layering of significations created a clearing where I could incorporate my own personal history. It’s not that I feel ashamed (today) to blatantly state what I feel or went through but the richness of language that developed from that strategy is something that I hope I can share with the world.”

Part of our series Unwriting Borders: Latinx Voices in the U.S., curated by Roberto Harrison and sponsored by the Milwaukee Arts Board.