• Address 720 East Locust Street | Milwaukee, WI 53212
  • Phone 414.263.5001
  • Hours Tue-Fri 11-8pm | Sat-Sun 12-5pm | Closed Mon
  • Hours Tue-Fri 11-8pm, Sat-Sun 12-5pm, Closed Mon
Event Calendar
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readings & workshops
April 6 - Sep 28

Book Club: Readshops led by Karl Gartung

readings & workshops
July 3 - Sep 25

Dhamma MKE

exhibitions
August 1 - Sep 26

The Point Being: Works by Thomas Gaudynski

special events
September 21

¡Palante!: A Celebration of Puerto Rican Arts and Culture

readings & workshops
September 22 - Oct 13

Friction in Fiction: Developing Characters and Conflict

readings & workshops
September 26

Poetry Reading: Jake Skeets & Manny Loley

readings & workshops
September 26

Poem as Field – Understanding Energy in Poetry a craft talk with Jake Skeets

readings & workshops
October 2

Poetry Reading: Alan Bernheimer & Karl Gartung

readings & workshops
October 16

Poetry Reading: Timothy Donnelly & Bethany Price

performances
October 17

Formations Series for New & Improvised Music

readings & workshops
October 19

Language as a Playground

readings & workshops
October 20

Reading: Peter Markus

readings & workshops
October 22 - Dec 31

Welcome Home!: A Veterans Writing Group

readings & workshops
October 23

Reading and Book Launch: Kathie Giorgio

readings & workshops
October 24

Urban Echo Poets

readings & workshops
October 27

Submitathon

readings & workshops
November 1

Reading and Screening: Trisha Low, Stephanie Young, and Zachary Epcar

readings & workshops
November 10 - Dec 8

Shifty Subjects and Unexpected Endings

special events
November 16

39th Anniversary Gala

Patricia Barone

Patricia Barone is a Milwaukee native and graduate of Marquette University, whose poetry has been anthologized by numerous publishers, including New Rivers Press and Prentice Hall. She is author of a novella, The Wind, and a book of poetry, Handmade Paper, both published by New Rivers Press. Her most recent poetry collection is The Scent of Water (Blue Light Press, 2013). Her awards include a Loft-McKnight Award of Distinction in poetry, a Lake Superior Contemporary Writers Award, and a Minnesota State Arts Board Career Opportunity Grant for a workshop with the Irish poet Eavan Boland.

Selected Poems

Survival

After the April blizzard,
we meet on the beach.
You torch the drift wood—
salt explodes in rainbows,
snow melt, steam and sizzle.
Lobsters hurtle down the dunes,
our kettle on the boil enough for all.

A man in pajamas brings a door
to sit on, our table. A girl finds wine
in rubble, and a boy holds a sea gull,
splinting its wing with his hands.
I'd live again for such a fire.

 

 

Seeing Through This World

Streetlight to streetlight,
through oil-slicked puddles,
no one removes a mask.

Inside, I slice chocolates,
and no one asks questions.
No glass in the caramel.
No razor in the cake.

Claire in her pink tutu pirouettes
to Offenbach's Bluebeard.
As she unwinds her spin,
my old Polaroid steals her whirl.

A flash and she emerges from the cloud—
green morphing peach, her hands
cupped above her head, her gauzy dress
blanched white, each black eyelash etched
then thinned, skin pallid, exposed.

As the trumpets fade,
the ghosts and clowns stop capering.

I pluck their sticky image out—
Children rising from the photo
forget to smile.

Looking back an era later,
by minutes or a century, we see

how Claire's arm lifts
and curves at the elbow, arabesque,
as she holds the poisoned apple of the world.

 

 

Blake's Beautiful Failure

Men stacking sheaves complain of the heat. Above one tree
on Peckham Rye, the air is filled with a host of clear wings.

Below is William, a hunched engraver who pushes his burin
to score a line not drawn by chance in the copper plate:

Yahweh and snake entwine, devils pulling Job below.
Soon they'll grab this ink-stained fool, old William.

Not the boy he was at nine years old—Will Blake,
who saw such visions! Gray-haired William weeps.

Like Job, he can't dispel devils or call prismatic angels.
He remembers a silver tree, bent low in a deasil wind.

Angels multiply in rainbows for young Will. The Seraphims' toes
skim the hedgerow and glide the whitebeam's low crown,

slowing the spinning leaves. Again, old William sees
a downy nimbus around each leaf; hair ripples in sunless light.

As the tree uplifts its cargo, Cherubim unsheathe
the carmine scales on each unopened bud.

They peel the laurel-green shells, as thin
as the skin on William's eye lids,

revealing creamy nipples; petals of each flower
unfurl. Stars on trembling petioles throng branches,

replacing angels' feet—Thrones and Dominions leave
but hover while petals fall. Will cries for fragrance and feathers.

William knows how ripeness turns to rot, how spent russet leaves
flame on dregs of grapes, called rape—only good for vinegar,

bad dreams: Ammonia fumes rise to old William's nose,
and he wakes Job before the fiends can chain him.

Men stacking sheaves complain of the heat. Above one tree
on Peckham Rye, the air is filled with a host of clear wings.