• Address 720 East Locust Street | Milwaukee, WI 53212
  • Phone 414.263.5001
  • Hours Tue-Fri 11-8pm | Sat-Sun 12-5pm | Closed Mon
  • Hours Tue-Fri 11-8pm, Sat-Sun 12-5pm, Closed Mon
Event Calendar
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readings & workshops
April 6 - Sep 28

Book Club: Readshops led by Karl Gartung

readings & workshops
July 3 - Sep 25

Dhamma MKE

exhibitions
August 1 - Sep 26

The Point Being: Works by Thomas Gaudynski

special events
September 21

¡Palante!: A Celebration of Puerto Rican Arts and Culture

readings & workshops
September 22 - Oct 13

Friction in Fiction: Developing Characters and Conflict

readings & workshops
September 26

Poetry Reading: Jake Skeets & Manny Loley

readings & workshops
September 26

Poem as Field – Understanding Energy in Poetry a craft talk with Jake Skeets

readings & workshops
October 2

Poetry Reading: Alan Bernheimer & Karl Gartung

readings & workshops
October 16

Poetry Reading: Timothy Donnelly & Bethany Price

performances
October 17

Formations Series for New & Improvised Music

readings & workshops
October 19

Language as a Playground

readings & workshops
October 20

Reading: Peter Markus

readings & workshops
October 22 - Dec 31

Welcome Home!: A Veterans Writing Group

readings & workshops
October 23

Reading and Book Launch: Kathie Giorgio

readings & workshops
October 24

Urban Echo Poets

readings & workshops
October 27

Submitathon

readings & workshops
November 1

Reading and Screening: Trisha Low, Stephanie Young, and Zachary Epcar

readings & workshops
November 10 - Dec 8

Shifty Subjects and Unexpected Endings

special events
November 16

39th Anniversary Gala

Derrick Harriell

Derrick Harriell was born and raised in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He's worked as assistant poetry editor forThird World Press and The Cream City Review and has taught community writing workshops for individuals of all ages, including senior citizens. He holds an MFA in Creative Writing from Chicago State University and a PhD in English from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. He is currently Assistant Professor of English and African American Studies at the University of Mississippi.

A two-time Pushcart Nominee, Harriell's poems have appeared in various literary journals and anthologies. His first collection of poems, Cotton was published by Aquarius Press-Willow Books in 2010. Ropes, his second full-length collection, was published earlier this year by Willow Books.

Praise for Ropes

     "In four rounds, Derrick Harriell tours us through the cultural history of boxing, from Mike Tyson and Joe Frazier to one of           the first African American pugilists, writing from 1855. These richly detailed persona poems are spoken by boxers and               also the journalists, cutmen, and girlfriends who surround the ring. Harriell's nuanced ear conveys not just the intimacies        of a sport but the intimacies of the human spirit. Ropes is a knock out." 
                                                                       -Beth Ann Fennelly, author of Tender Hooks and Open House

     "Derrick Harriell has mined the human history of lives perpetually in fight and woven a gutbucket stench of ghetto wail and       back alley holler survival. The work of these four rounds, the transparent employment of voice and source, working the             head, body, groin, and knees, is a flurry of converging dialogues, real and cleverly imagined, in conversation with self,             God, Uncle Sam, other Black pugilists, and the women who adorn these boxers as trinket and stain.Ropes confirms                   Derrick Harriell is among the finest young poets in the country." 
                                         -Quraysh Ali Lansana, author of mystic turf
 

Selected Poems

Jamaal X Jackson Converts Mike to Islam


Derrick Harriell

 

Indiana Youth Center, 1993

See, there's puppets, masters, and puppet masters
and minions, and minions to the minions
and badass wolves in Stacey Adams
who tap dance on roots, and by roots
I don't mean the nappy curb on your forehead
but that river running through your dream.
You see it before laying your dome
on a steel bench, it wakes you
screaming, looking to punch anything
with two eyes. Brother don't you know
Jesus was from Bed-Stuy, that Mary
was a jazz singer from Harlem. Don't you know
you come from sophisticated songbirds,
that there's a Viduidae in your tree.
You're more than a bad nigger
with a bad knee, more than your fornications,
than the knives flying out your eyes.
Rejoice in knowing we're all an X
away from sunshine.